Locomotive Class

Class M7

Class M7 Class: Class M7
Type: Steam
Designer: Dugald Drummond
Weight: 61 tons
Purpose: Suburban Passenger

Information: The successful M7 class was introduced in 1897 by the London South Western Railway (LSWR) primarily for hauling heavy commuter trains in and out of London. In later years the class was distributed through-out the Southern Region of British Railways for operation of branch line traffic, while many remained in their home territory hauling empty stock workings in the busy London area.

Details: By 1890 London commuter traffic was growing at a pace requiring larger and more powerful locomotives. Dugald Drummond had recently been appointed Mechanical Engineer with the LSWR after gaining work experience from railway companies in both his native Scotland and further afield in Australia. The LSWR required more powerful locomotives to support the increase of commuter traffic from the southern suburbs into London. The resulting M7 class was the largest and heaviest 0-4-4T to ever be used in Britain. Between 1897 and 1911, 105 examples were built in five batches with the majority constructed at Nine Elms Locomotive Works with the remainder being built at Eastleigh.
Variations between the batches were both internal and external in appearance; the most obvious external difference being the length of frame and resulting front end over-hang. Many members were fitted for push-pull operation making the class even more versatile for their intended service.
By 1948, when the successors to the LSWR, Southern Railways was incorporated into British Railways all but one member remained in active service. During the same year number (30) 672 was involved in an accident and cut-up. The remainder lasted until 1957 when the class fell victim of the Modernisation Plan. By 1964 the entire class had been taken-out of service as branch lines were decimated and remaining local services were taken over by DMUís; while stock workings were increasingly handled by Class 09 diesel shunters.
Colourful liveries, typical of passenger locomotives adorned these locomotives through LSWR and Southern ownership. Under British Railways ownership the class was gradually repainted in somber mixed traffic lined black livery.
Two members survived into preservation. Number (30)245 was withdrawn in 1962 and allocated a place with the National Railway Museum for posterity. Number (30)053 being sold to Steamtown USA in 1967, where it remained as a non-working display until repatriated with the Swanage Heritage Railway in Dorset in 1987, where it has since been restored to fully operational status.

John Faulkner

Class M7 Releases (18)

MODEL NO. LIVERY
Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive
Released: 2006
30479 B.R. Black
Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive
Released: 2006 2007
30031 B.R. Black
Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive (Weathered)
Released: 2006 2007
30108 B.R. Black
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 1987 1988
30111 B.R. Black
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 2006
357 S.R. Olive Green
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 2007 2008
111 S.R. Olive Green
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 2007 2008
30023 B.R. Black
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 2008 2009
676 S.R. Malachite Green
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 2008 2009
30056 B.R. Black
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 2008 2009
30036 B.R. Black
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Released: 2010 2011
242 S.R. Malachite Green
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive (Ex LSWR)
Released: 2009
42 S.R. Olive Green
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive (Ex LSWR)
Released: 2010 2011
51 S.R. Olive Green
Class M7 Locomotive
Released: 1985 1986
249 S.R. Olive Green
Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Released: 1972 1973 1974
245 S.R. Olive Green
Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Released: 1970 1971
328 S.R. Malachite Green
Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Released: 1969 1970
30027 B.R. Black
Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Released: 1967 1968
30021 B.R. Black

Class M7 Images (18)

Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive 30479

Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive 30031

Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive (Weathered)
Class M7 0-4-4 Locomotive (Weathered) 30108

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 30111

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 357

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 111

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 30023

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 676

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 30056

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 30036

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive 242

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive (Ex LSWR)
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive (Ex LSWR) 42

Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive (Ex LSWR)
Class M7 0-4-4T Locomotive (Ex LSWR) 51

Class M7 Locomotive
Class M7 Locomotive 249

Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Class M7 Tank Locomotive 245

Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Class M7 Tank Locomotive 328

Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Class M7 Tank Locomotive 30027

Class M7 Tank Locomotive
Class M7 Tank Locomotive 30021


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Database

11,326 yearly Items over 57 Years.
4,068 individual Items.
3,708 Models.
360 catalogued Train Sets.
156 Train Packs.
820 Steam Locomotives.
497 Diesel Locomotives.
1,082 Passenger Coaches.
1,153 Freight Wagons.


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